De-Materialized Architecture: Interrupted Transmissions in an Encoded Space

The wall as the fundamental building block of architecture is reaching obsolescence with the rise of technology. This project will explore materialization in a highly encoded space of information by projecting silhouettes on to a wall. As an installation, this addresses how inhabitants can input information into a system that reacts to transmission, interference, and hacking. These interactions will test how programmatic use of an interior space is read on the exterior façade of a building, reinterpreting the relationship between wall as interface, the wall space and space occupied by users.

Description

A portion of the project involves an installation. The recording of silhouettes interacting with a wall will be interpreted through computer software (PS3 Eye Cature, CCV, and AfterEffects). The recordings will be translated into patterns through manipulation of infrared light through contrast and exposure.

The findings from the installation will lead to the possible design of a façade that reinterprets the interior programs of 1) a headquarters for a cloud technology company and 2) a local radio station in North Korea.

Intentions

As technologies shrink and vanish from sight, the ‘invisible detail’ in architecture has become the microchip that is embedded into walls. In effect, the wall is rematerializing as a transmitter and receiver of information (communication, radio interference, and personal data).

Buildings in North Korea are like a low-tech hard drive. Controlled television and radio programs limit what people know, which translates to how they interact in space. Ultimately, this produced a contrived architecture that is as mute as its inhabitants. As an interpretation of North Korea’s technological ban, I will be exploring the implications of this on the façade of a building and how it alters the user of interior program. The outside does not make visually explicit the microchip as the physical components of the building; it must be hidden from outside view while still instigating a powerful interaction between people or between people and the wall becoming “living bits and bricks” (AD Architectural Design Magazine) that are seen in the interior wall.

A more explicit case study of the above conditions are office park buildings of Cloud service technology companies, in particular that of the company Rackspace, which is a appropriated shopping mall. The exterior muteness of this building is a representation of the need for the building to act as a fire walled, high tech fortress of information.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “De-Materialized Architecture: Interrupted Transmissions in an Encoded Space

  1. “I will be exploring the implications of this on the façade of a building and how it alters the user of interior program. The outside does not make visually explicit the microchip as the physical components of the building; it must be hidden from outside view while still instigating a powerful interaction between people or between people and the wall becoming “living bits and bricks”(Ar) that are seen in the interior wall.”

    This is the most clear bit of the above in my opinion. The placement in Korea is not exactly clear, though it does suggest a reason for this cloaked “watching” or sensing between the interior and the exterior – particularly if the exterior is blank. If the exterior is not blank – how might it respond to users without giving away that they are being watched (added time lapse as well as transformation?) but still encourage them to interact – to unwittingly enable surveillance.

    The mall precedent is an intriguing reference – convincing in some ways of the potential of a masked building. Are there other precedents that relate to the communication aspect. (I know there are, and that you know them (like hypersurface), but you don’t mention them here.)

    Hacking, transmission, and interference could use some clarification as well. Who’s the hacker, the user inside watching without permission? Is the transmission the person being watched? And is the wall the interference because embedded in its technology is the transformation that makes the transmission only readable to the hacker?

    Your first sentence about the wall being made obsolete is problematic since currently your approach leans heavily on the wall’s presence and an awareness of its presence. Perhaps address instead how technology is changing the nature of many architectural elements, such that something determined to be a solid boundary, like a wall, may actually be an open connection – behaving more like a window, a telephone, or a radio – instead of or in addition to being a physical divider.

    HOPE THIS HELPS!!!

    Like

    • The surveillance aspect is definitely something that can be tied back to North Korean society as well– I didn’t know this but apparently high officials who have access to cell phones are being constantly monitored for anti-party content.

      I’m starting to look at the Kunsthaus Graz, which is like an inversion of the mall precedent. And yes to hypersurface! I was looking at this: http://www.refikanadol.com/works/augmented-structures-v1-0/

      That’s exactly it— the wall could be both the inference and the transmitter, a physical divider and “an open connection” like you mention.

      Thank you so much for your insights!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s